Rainbow Crochet Granny Square Pattern…

rainbow-rugHere’s a new crochet pattern for you to try… a very easy scrap yarn crochet rug (afghan) pattern, ideal for the less experienced but also great fun for the more advanced.

The finished rug (afghan) as featured in the photo measures approx 117cm (46”) x 117cm (46”) & each individual square measures approx 18 cm (7”) x 18 cm (7”). This, of course, may vary depending on your choice of yarn & hook.

Requirements for rainbow rug (afghan) pattern as featured in photo: 200g of each: yellow, orange, red, purple, blue, green – 400g grey – Hook size: 4.50 (US: G)

Make as many squares as you need depending on your project – a little cot cover, a medium TV knee rug or a king size bedspread.

Although I’ve given yarn & hook requirements, this is your project – work with your own preferred yarn, colours & appropriate hook.

pink rainbow2pink rainbow1blue rainbow1blue rainbow22 tone rainbow12 toned rainbow2rainbow1rainbow2rainbow3rainbow4rainbow5rainbow6

 This pattern is available for sale on Etsy & Ravelry

Tapestry Crochet – 64 Playful Patterns for Children… Book Release….

Tapestry_coverFrontXI’m so happy to announce the release of my latest pattern book ‘Tapestry Crochet, 64 playful patterns for children’, published by Sally Milner Publishing.

This book is another crochet sampler & my aim is to introduce readers to yet another crochet technique & encourage avid experienced crocheters & beginners alike to try something new, expand their repertoire & enjoy themselves with some colourful, fun designs.

Utilising all 64 patterns will result in a rug (afghan) approx 152cm x 152cm (60” x 60”) in size but there is no reason why you can’t choose a selection of favourites (say 30 to 36 squares) for a smaller knee rug (afghan) or, by putting together just 4 squares you’ll have a colourful cushion face.

The patterns are divided into 8 sections:

(1) Figures & letters ~ (2) Signs & symbols ~ (3) Children & toys ~ (4) Transport (5) Fruit & veg ~ (6) Around the house ~ (7) This & that ~ (8) Birds & animals

so you can please yourself which designs suit your project… be it for a boy or girl, baby, young child or teenager… or even work just a few patterned squares alternated with plain coloured squares…

In Tapestry Crochet (as in Intarsia/Jacquard) a chart, graph or grid is used instead of written instructions for coloured patterns. Each square equals a stitch, each line equals a row and each blank square equals the main colour. Follow grids from the bottom and read right-side rows from right to left and wrong-side rows from left to right. All squares are worked in double crochet [dc] (US: single crochet [sc]). And, for reader convenience, I have written the required number of stitches for each colour, with arrows indicating row direction.   tapestry_rug   I’m really pleased to be able to bring you this collection of Tapestry designs & I hope it gives you hours of creative enjoyment – Renate

Aussie Inspired… A women’s handbag

red gum bag 1This piece is one that I finished recently where I’ve attempted to impart the colours of Australia into a woman’s handbag…. the purple blues of the sky, blue greens of the ocean & the vibrancy of our  fascinating bush in its winter glory. red gum bag 2         Freeform crochet Gum leaf motifs, red bullion gum blossoms, metallic buttons, an assortment of beads & Vilene patches were melded together to create this  Australian inspired piece… a medium size women’s handbag lined in a Royal Blue satin, with sturdy twisted cane recycled/repurposed handles – you can find this bag in my Etsy Shop

Filet Crochet Tutorial – The Basics

FIL-TITLE-1This Filet Crochet Tutorial has been a long time coming &, to those of you who have been waiting for it, please accept my apologies… I have to admit that writing the instructions in ‘plain speak’ for easy understanding proved to be a bit more challenging than working the actual technique itself…

Filet crochet lace is possibly one of the easiest techniques to master. Most of you will recognise Filet as fine lace like items such as: curtains, tablecloths & runners, or ground fabric for Irish lace motifs traditionally worked in cotton thread with a steel hook… it’s delicate, old-world & lovely.Book mark

However, if you take it a step further, Filet also makes a fabulous ground fabric for your Freeform motifs, or scarves & shawls, when worked in 8 ply (or your yarn of choice) with an appropriate hook – traditionalist may cringe at this but most of you know my approach by now… I like to mixed it up & give anything a try…

In any case, whether you want to work traditionally or venture out & experiment, the basics for Filet are the same… I hope this comprehensive tutorial gives you everything you need, from reading charts to working an armhole on a vest, & becomes a good reference point that leads the way into this age-old technique.

Patterns are presented to the reader as charts or grids instead of written patterns so with a bit of graph paper you can even create your own designs if you have a mind to.

You can purchase the pattern from here,

ScarfPurse

The Filet crochet tutorial (17 pages) takes you through the basics of Filet Crochet in both written (UK & US terminology) & diagram form & covers the following:

  • How to read charts (graphs) – (pg 2)
  • Determining the number of chains required for foundation chain (pg 2)
  • What is a Space, Block, Lacet & Bar(pg 3)
  • Stitch Abbreviations(pg 3)
  • Stitch Guide (written & drawings): slip st, dc (US sc), tr (US dc) (pg 4)
  • Stitch Guide continued: dtr (US tr), trtr (US dtr) – tr decrease (US dc decrease) (pg 5)
  • Basic Filet Mesh Lace (written, diagram & drawing): spaces & blocks  (pg 6)
  • Basic Filet mesh lace continued: Lacets & bars (pg 7)
  • Shaping: increasing space at beginning & end of row (pg 8)
  • Shaping continued: decreasing space at beginning & end of row, increasing block at beginning & end of row, decreasing block at beginning & end of row (pg 9)
  • Shaping for Garments: increasing blocks at beginning & end of rows – (pg 10)
  • Shaping for garments continued: increasing spaces at beginning & end of rows (pg 11)
  • Shaping for garments continued: decreasing & decreasing blocks at beginning & end of rows – (pg-12)
  •  Three super easy projects to get you started
  • Book Mark (chart & photo) – (pg 13)
  • Scarf (photo & chart) – (pg 14)
  • Purse – (chart, photo, written, diagrams, drawings) (pg 15 to 17)

filet purse

That’s a mighty giant crochet hook, but what to do with it?

giant hook2I’ve had this giant, wooden crochet hook for the longest time, I may have found it in an OP shop or perhaps someone gave it to me… I simply can’t remember… in any case, it’s been sitting idle in my hook collection for many years with no idea what size it could be (though compared to a 6.50 mm (US K), it’s mighty big), or what it could be used for…

I’m presuming that some clever person hand-carved it & lovingly sanded it down to feel as smooth as silk… nevertheless, I’ve always found it awkward to work with &, after a few of feeble attempts, just abandoned it…giant hook1

That is, until a couple of months ago when I wanted to crochet some really woolly, chunky scarves, you know the kind that you can wrap around & around yourself, thick & lush to keep out the frostiest cold winds… &, suddenly, that mighty giant hook might just be the ticket… I started with 2 strands of yarn… No, not chunky enough… 3 strands, then 4 but finally settled on 5 strands of what I hope are complimentary colours. It wasn’t nearly as awkward as I remembered & the scarves worked up really fast. I think I got a bit carried away too, hence their length… the yellow/brown one being approx 272 cm (107”) & the green one approx 317.50 cm (125”).

So that’s a couple of scarves… I’m sure there are many more items that could be created with this mighty hook… I just haven’t thought of any yet… Any ideas? Or perhaps you have your own giant hook story… we’d all love to hear them…

green chunkyDSCF9666DSCF9674DSCF9671

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