working Crochet in the Round

I’ve been getting quite a few queries lately about Working Crochet in the Round. Rather than continually answering each individual question, I decided to put together this basic instruction sheet for Working Crochet in the Round. Understanding the basic formulas for keeping your work flat & avoiding your crochet work from going astray is important so, I trust the instruction sheet is helpful.

The 2 most common questions: 

1)Why is my work cupping? – this usually means there are not enough increases 

2) Why is my work wavy? – this usually means there are too many increases

Working in the round is a little different from working on rows. To keep your work flat you must evenly increase every round & this varies when working circles or squares. I’ve given both written instructions & charts to help you better understand.

A Beginners’ Crochet Notebook…

A Beginners’ Crochet Notebook… click here for the tutorial

I receive many, many emails from folk needing help with their crochet; not only from frustrated beginners, but also from those who have been crocheting for a while asking, what for some are, fairly basic questions… But there is no such thing as a silly, stupid or ‘I should know this’ type of query, even after many years of crocheting there are always new things to learn.

 

And so, I’ve put together this Beginners’ Crochet Notebook to help those of you who want to start crocheting but don’t know where to begin. And, even though I’ve written this notebook mainly with the novice in mind, that doesn’t mean the more experience crocheter won’t find a few helpful tips as well.

~What hooks to use with which yarn. 

~Which yarns are: animal, plant or synthetic. 

~How to read patterns. 

~What those scary, abbreviations & symbols mean…&  lots more.

 

I’ve done my best to gathered together answers to the most frequent questions I receive, but of course, it’s impossible to have an answer for everything. There is so much more information I could have included in this Notebook; so much more the reader might find useful; but it’s such a fine line between cramming in too much & overwhelming you.

Nevertheless, I trust this tutorial is a comprehensive journey through the crochet basics for the beginner & others, & that it encourages you to venture forth with a little more confidence & understanding of this wonderful craft.

A Great way to start 2015 & A Big Thank You…

Another big Thank You to all the ladies who came along to the ‘Welcome Back Afternoon’ yesterday (11th Jan 2015)… we had a lovely time even though we sweltered in the heat &, despite the determined ants who almost ate us out of house & home… Welcome to the new ladies who came to check things out &, of course, welcome back to all you gorgeous regular folk… 2015 is going to be great!! Here are some pics of finished projects & works in progress… What a clever bunch!!

Alwyn's freeform

Barbara

Doreen

Margaret

Wendy M

Wendy N

Filet Crochet Tutorial – The Basics

FIL-TITLE-1This Filet Crochet Tutorial has been a long time coming &, to those of you who have been waiting for it, please accept my apologies… I have to admit that writing the instructions in ‘plain speak’ for easy understanding proved to be a bit more challenging than working the actual technique itself…

Filet crochet lace is possibly one of the easiest techniques to master. Most of you will recognise Filet as fine lace like items such as: curtains, tablecloths & runners, or ground fabric for Irish lace motifs traditionally worked in cotton thread with a steel hook… it’s delicate, old-world & lovely.Book mark

However, if you take it a step further, Filet also makes a fabulous ground fabric for your Freeform motifs, or scarves & shawls, when worked in 8 ply (or your yarn of choice) with an appropriate hook – traditionalist may cringe at this but most of you know my approach by now… I like to mixed it up & give anything a try…

In any case, whether you want to work traditionally or venture out & experiment, the basics for Filet are the same… I hope this comprehensive tutorial gives you everything you need, from reading charts to working an armhole on a vest, & becomes a good reference point that leads the way into this age-old technique.

Patterns are presented to the reader as charts or grids instead of written patterns so with a bit of graph paper you can even create your own designs if you have a mind to.

You can purchase the pattern from here,

ScarfPurse

The Filet crochet tutorial (17 pages) takes you through the basics of Filet Crochet in both written (UK & US terminology) & diagram form & covers the following:

  • How to read charts (graphs) – (pg 2)
  • Determining the number of chains required for foundation chain (pg 2)
  • What is a Space, Block, Lacet & Bar(pg 3)
  • Stitch Abbreviations(pg 3)
  • Stitch Guide (written & drawings): slip st, dc (US sc), tr (US dc) (pg 4)
  • Stitch Guide continued: dtr (US tr), trtr (US dtr) – tr decrease (US dc decrease) (pg 5)
  • Basic Filet Mesh Lace (written, diagram & drawing): spaces & blocks  (pg 6)
  • Basic Filet mesh lace continued: Lacets & bars (pg 7)
  • Shaping: increasing space at beginning & end of row (pg 8)
  • Shaping continued: decreasing space at beginning & end of row, increasing block at beginning & end of row, decreasing block at beginning & end of row (pg 9)
  • Shaping for Garments: increasing blocks at beginning & end of rows – (pg 10)
  • Shaping for garments continued: increasing spaces at beginning & end of rows (pg 11)
  • Shaping for garments continued: decreasing & decreasing blocks at beginning & end of rows – (pg-12)
  •  Three super easy projects to get you started
  • Book Mark (chart & photo) – (pg 13)
  • Scarf (photo & chart) – (pg 14)
  • Purse – (chart, photo, written, diagrams, drawings) (pg 15 to 17)

filet purse

Surface Embellishments – Crochet Tips & Tricks Update….

Surface Embellishment: is an important component of freeform, it’s a great way of bringing your personality, your style & your skills to your work & putting your own stamp on your project. There are 1000’s of ways to embellish & I have covered but a few basics that I hope you find helpful & encourage you to experiment…

Rummage through your buttons & beads. Have another look at your embroidery threads & don’t forget those cords & braids that you’ve kept forever & haven’t had a use for; try to think outside of the box; if you’re anything like me & keep stuff simply because you love the colour, texture, sheen or whatever, you won’t have any trouble finding interesting ways to embellish your work.  And, it doesn’t only apply to freeform. A drab pullover, scarf or beanie can sometimes be redeemed with a little extra bling…

So, to everyone who has contacted me asking how to add that extra something to their work, I hope I’ve answered at least some of your questions…

You will find the Surface Embellishment page here – enjoy!